One key point has leapt out in relation to optical fiber networks, Recommendation 4.9.

The FCC should ensure appropriate balance in its copper retirement policies

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Following on from our previous articles on the US National Broadband Plan, this article discusses in more detail Chapter 3 which addresses the current state of the broadband ecosystem.
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Gordon Brown’s Building Britain’s Digital Future speech last Monday raised a few eyebrows with hopes of leading the world in the digital economy.

The key point is; that to make the most of everything the web can provide, everybody must be connected to it.
Not connected with slow, unreliable connections, but connected as they are to the electricity and water supply.
The web has proved that thanks to some of the most creative people in the world, the technology available online will always surpass our expectations. Not only will it do this, but with the advent of readily, reliably accessible data in the right hands, efficiency of government and business will improve dramatically.

So, how to enable it?

The answer is very simple. Provide a solid infrastructure based on the reliable power of optical fibre and the web will grow to fill it.



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Following on from our article on the key points of the National Broadband Plan, we’ve set out the likely impacts on Fiber network developers below:
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Posted by: miniflex | March 17, 2010

Top Ten Points from National Broadband Plan, Ch. 2

The US National Broadband Plan has been released. The document runs to 300 pages, so we thought that it would be a good idea to break the document down into bite sized chunks. Every day, we are going to serialize the chapters that relate to Optical Fiber and Networking. First, the “top 10 points” and then a follow up article with our “top 10 insights.”

Main Goals from Chapter 2 of the National Broadband Plan

  1. 100Mbps D/L – 50Mbps U/L goal for 100 million households by 2020
  2. 50Mbps D/L – 20Mbps U/L goal for 100 million households by 2015
  3. Lead the world in Wireless network capability
  4. Make 500Mhz of Wireless spectrum available by 2020
  5. Make 300Mhz of Wireless spectrum available by 2015
  6. Ensure every citizen has access to broadband, at a price they can afford
  7. Aim for an adoption rate of over 90% by 2020
  8. Every anchor institution such as schools and hospitals should have a minimum 1Gbps broadband service
  9. Create a national wireless first responder emergency network by 2020
  10. Every citizen should be able to monitor their power usage on a Smart Grid energy network



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Posted by: miniflex | March 15, 2010

Easy guide to FTTH

Who will find this guide useful?

This guide is designed to help everyone newly involved in making decisions about Fiber-To-The-Home, such as those communities interested in responding to Google’s recent Google Fiber campaign and ‘Request for Information.’

We have simplified many of the core topics so you can quickly get to grips with the key processes and make your decision-making process easier.

What actually is FTTH?

FTTH, or Fiber-To-The-Home is the method for deploying optical fiber cable from the center of nationwide networks to the front door of your home. Fiber cable is already commonly used up to the point of your utility exchange and sometimes right up to the utility cabinets in your streets.

Diagram of FTTH
Fig. 1 – Scope of an FTTH deployment

As you can see in the above diagram, FTTH is the physical process of replacing or upgrading copper telecoms wiring that comes from your local exchange or cabinet, with optical fiber cable.

Why do we need to know about FTTH?

FTTH is the new way of bringing the internet, television and other broadband services into the home. It is only recently that the technology has become affordable for worldwide deployment. However, we need to be aware of the different challenges FTTH poses.
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The Transport Secretary Lord Adonis has announced the estimated cost of providing 120 miles of high speed rail from London to Birmingham to be £17.4bn, starting work in 2017.

Using recent technical innovations, instead of just reaching Birmingham the government could connect every home and the whole country with optical fibre for this sort of money. Instead of waiting to start high speed rail in 2017 the Fibre Broadband rollout could start tomorrow and be delivering value to the economy long before then.

The bigger question is, will we still need high speed rail networks if we have optical fibre to every home and business in Britain?

It could be and has been argued that super fast broadband will dramatically cut the need for everybody to travel so much. Working from home, video conferencing and increased use of social tools will reduce the need for people to travel great distances quickly. The high speed internet will provide a faster and easier solution; help reduce our carbon emissions to
boot and foster things like tele-medicine, tele-education, and care in the home etc. which will save money in the health and education budgets as well!
Lord Carter went into the benefits in more detail in his Digital Britain Report (April 2009). Maybe Lord Adonis and Lord Carter should compare notes.

Peter Jenkins, Technical Director

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/highspeed-rail-network-plans-being-unveiled-1919672.html

Slashdot It!


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Posted by: miniflex | February 19, 2010

Miniflex on burying Optical Fibre underground.

Best Practice article looking into the deployment of underground fibre.

Article originally published in OSP Magazine

I recently had a small epiphany watching my black lab Snowplow bury a bone in the backyard. Why did he do this? Because that bone was something precious to him and he wanted to protect it from any number of things that could cause him not to be able to use it in the future.

We actually could learn a lot from dogs. They choose to protect what is precious to them by using the safety of the earth. In a similar manner, we do the same for the valuable fiber we chose to install underground and wish to use in the future.

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Miniflex, the leading vendor of optical fibre protection, management and installation solutions, is delighted with the results of a recent research project that supports its Fibre-To-The-Home (FTTx) solution set. Miniflex already has an established customer base across the globe but the results bear out that demand for high-speed internet grows continuously whilst the business pressures of rolling out the necessary infrastructure remain challenging.

The report was conducted by the FTTH Council North America (www.ftthcouncil.org) and highlights the fact that “the most satisfied broadband users in the US are those that have a direct fibre connection to their homes”. The report goes onto say that “Having a fibre connection was rated as one of the five most important amenities to have in a new home with 82% of FTTH subscribers saying that “very high speed Internet” would be an important factor in buying a new home”.

Miniflex’s Fibre-from-the-Home solution is designed to deliver service providers with an economic, fast and easy-to-deploy method for connecting subscribers with its QuikPush™ and DVC™ Microduct products.

As the demand for high speed data connection increases, more and more Telco’s, property developers, building owners and other service providers are turning to Miniflex for their subscriber connection. For more information on the Miniflex FTTx Solution please contact: Paul Ekpenyong at p.ekpenyong@miniflex.co.uk or Scot Bohaychyk at scot@miniflexusa.com.

Additional information and reference material credits
For the full version on the FTTH Council North America survey please go to: http://www.ftthcouncil.org/en/newsroom/2009/06/29/survey-of-broadband-users-shows-satisfaction-highest-among-those-with-direct-fib


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Posted by: miniflex | July 9, 2009

Miniflex FTTx Solution gains RUS listing

Miniflex, the leading vendor of optical fibre protection, management and installation solutions, announced today that its FTTx Solution portfolio has been accepted for listing by the United States Department of Agriculture’s Rural Utilities Service (RUS). This means that qualifying rural US telephone companies can deploy Miniflex FTTx products using long-term, low-interest loans funded by the U.S. federal government. The loan program is designed to keep costs down, enabling customers in rural areas to have access to the same services as those offered by the larger regional and national carriers by supporting the extension of broadband networks into rural areas and to support distance learning and telemedicine initiatives.

Miniflex’s FTTx product portfolio is already being used and trialled by a number of independent Telco’s in the Midwest of the USA and their backing was important in achieving this listing said a company spokesman.

The Miniflex Fibre-to-the-Home installation system offers the only totally non-spliced FTTH connectivity solution for connecting the subscriber to the optical fibre network. Our FTTH solution set comprises our UL listed (UL 2024) DVC™ Microduct; pre-connectorised QuikPush™ drop cable which is pushed through the Microduct; WAM™ battery powered installation tool which is used to push the drop cable and SNAC™ network access terminal into which the QuikPush™ cable is connected. This deployment approach provides a “Plug ‘n’ Play” solution that requires lower skilled personnel and saves on equipment, time and money.

Miniflex’s FTTx Solution is designed to deliver service providers with an economic, fast and easy-to-deploy method for connecting subscribers and this is what our customers have bought into, said Miniflex Sales and marketing Director, Paul Ekpenyong.

As the demand for high speed data connection increases, more and more Telco’s, property developers, building owners and other service providers are turning to Miniflex for their subscriber connection.

For more information on the Miniflex FTTx Solution please contact: Paul Ekpenyong at p.ekpenyong@miniflex.co.uk or Scot Bohaychyk at scot@miniflexusa.com.

Additional information

The RUS listing can be found at: http://www.usda.gov/rus/telecom/materials/pdf_files/latest-changes-06-12-2009.pdf


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